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HESP 214 - The Research Behind Headlines on Words, Thought, and Behavior

This is a guide to UMD Libraries resources available for students of HESP 214.

"Research has shown..."

Look at this abstract of a peer-reviewed scientific study:

1) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21401691

Now quickly skim these two articles linked below -

2) https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/19/smarter-living/simple-ways-to-be-better-at-remembering.html

3) https://www.lifehack.org/480635/6-ways-to-improve-your-memory

All three deal with the subject of memory. The scientific study is an example of the sort of article on this topic that can catch the interest of the popular press. The other two articles are examples of what can result when scientific results are adapted for the average reader by journalists.

Now think about the following questions in relation to articles 2 and 3, the journalistic articles:

  1. Which seems more "trustworthy" and why?
  2. Do you believe you actually learned anything useful by reading these articles?
  3. What are the goals of the two articles? Are they the same?
  4. Is there a difference in tone in these two articles?
  5. After reading both articles, would you be inclined to try any of the memory apps mentioned in the LIfehack article? What if you had only read the Lifehack article?